Chess Tip
Decline Draw Offers

This is a chess tip for beginners and players, who are still trying to reach higher levels of chess.

Many chess players do accept a draw offer very often prematurely. An interesting position has just emerged, but still they do accept the draw or offer a draw themselves to avoid fighting for a win. The position is full of tactical and positional potential, but still: Draw agreed.

I am telling you, this is not the way to learn chess at all. If you don't like playing the game to the end, then why did you started it in the first place. Some players hate losing so badly that they rather accept a draw before the position gets too complicated and reaches a point, where draw offers can hardly be made.

Play the game to the end, that's why you have started it or not. You want to play chess, then do it. If the position finally is a draw, then this is the fair outcome of the game, so be it. But you have learned something during the game and have improved your tactical and positional skills.

Another disgraceful thing is, to offer a draw, when you have obviously a losing position. This is just like an offense towards your opponent. The player who does this, probably thinks that the opponent is too stupid and not aware of the fact, that he is winning. I would feel ashamed of myself, if I would offer a draw when I am clearly losing. I rather lose or resign.

To learn chess you need to play the game. No playing, no learning. It's as simple as that. You can't improve if you don't play on. Don't play for points, but play to improve your skills. You will make the points later on, when the time is right and you have risen to a higher level. This takes practice, patience and time.

It is ridiculous to give a draw after a few moves or before the game has even started. This way you never learn how to play the endgame, because you never get there. Draw agreed again.

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