Free Chess Training

Enjoy free chess training…Play and win the game below. You have an advantage of 6 pawns. Advantage is measured as pawn units.

White is just one pawn up, but still his position is better than six pawns compared to Blacks position even though he is just ONE pawn up. This was estimated by strong computer chess programs.

This shows that just having more material is not the only criteria for evaluating a chess position.

Additional Advantages for White in this Game are:

  • Two white rooks are controlling the f-file versus two passive black rooks, the black rook at a8 does nothing and is useless in respect to the problem area, which is the kingside, that’s where the action is and here the black pieces are needed. So White is one rook up IN THAT AREA as the black rook at a8 sleeps and will never enter the battle field.
  • White queen is more active than Black’s queen which is placed passive and just protects a weak pawn at e6. This is not an honorable task for a queen because it is simply inffective as the queen cannot unfold its total strenght.
  • White has a far advanced protected passed pawn at d6 which has the desire to go forward in the future and this makes it dangerous. So Black is forced to keep an eye on this pawn or it will promote to a queen sometime later. This inhibits the unfolding of Blacks forces and reduces Blacks flexibilty.
  • Black has a weak pawn at e6 that is attacked twice by white rook and white bishop.
  • The knights are placed roughly equal but the black bishop shoots into open air without attacking anything, whereas the white bishop attacks the weak e6-pawn, this shows the white bishop is better than the black bishop that is just an isolated figure and does not work together with his own forces, as these are not properly developed.
  • The white Queen is indirectly attacking the e6-pawn as well. If you apply x-ray vision then you will see that.

Now it is up to you to win this game. I wish you good luck.

You are White – Win it



free chess training
free chess training


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